JOLO's Everthing Blog

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JOLO’s Everthing Blog turned 1 today!

neurosciencestuff:

Tweeting a killer migraine in real time
Not even the pain of a migraine headache keeps people from Twitter.
Over the course of a week, students collected every tweet that mentioned the word migraine. Once they cleared out the ads, the retweets and the metaphorical uses of the word, they had 14,028 tweets from people who described their migraine headaches in real time —  with words such as “killer,” “the worst” (almost 15% of the tweets) and the F-word.
The Twitter users also reported the repercussions from their migraines:  missing school or work, lost sleep, mood changes.
The researchers found the information to be “a powerful source of knowledge” about the headaches, because usually sufferers are providing information after the fact in clinical situations.
“The technology evolves, and our language evolves,” Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and lead author of the study, said Wednesday by phone. Clinical researchers’ language —  such as “throbbing” or “pulsating” —  might not be as apt today, to “the generation that grew up with video games.”
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This perfect picture to show how my head feels with a migraine

neurosciencestuff:

Tweeting a killer migraine in real time

Not even the pain of a migraine headache keeps people from Twitter.

Over the course of a week, students collected every tweet that mentioned the word migraine. Once they cleared out the ads, the retweets and the metaphorical uses of the word, they had 14,028 tweets from people who described their migraine headaches in real time with words such as “killer,” “the worst” (almost 15% of the tweets) and the F-word.

The Twitter users also reported the repercussions from their migraines:  missing school or work, lost sleep, mood changes.

The researchers found the information to be “a powerful source of knowledge” about the headaches, because usually sufferers are providing information after the fact in clinical situations.

“The technology evolves, and our language evolves,” Dr. Alexandre DaSilva, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and lead author of the study, said Wednesday by phone. Clinical researchers’ language such as “throbbing” or “pulsating” might not be as apt today, to “the generation that grew up with video games.”

Read more

This perfect picture to show how my head feels with a migraine

I’m so fucking bored!

My life at work today….

(Source: wasalswearengen)

Support for [medical marijuana] ballot measures and similar efforts…transcends political lines. Why? Because cancer, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and other chronic and terminal diseases have no partisan affiliations.

Michelle Malkin, in a somewhat surprising but admirable post about the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana in her state, Colorado

What’s interesting about this piece is that Malkin, a staunch social conservative, admits that she worries about “the negative costs, abuses and cultural consequences of unbridled recreational pot use”—but she also observes that legalized marijuana has real benefits for people who need it as medicine, and that the legal pot shops in CO are clean, safe, and professional as they fulfill a need demanded in the newly free marijuana market.

This article is a great example of the way social conservatives can take a libertarian political approach to these sorts of issues while not abandoning their own convictions. It’s also a testament to the persuasive value of personal stories in changing people’s minds on the drug war. Definitely give it a read.

(via hipsterlibertarian)

This is a great article.